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Detecting a sinkhole: New device geared for homeowners – wave3.com-Louisville News, Weather & Sports

Detecting a sinkhole: New device geared for homeowners Karst map for the state of Kentucky (Source: Kentucky Geological Society)Karst map for the state of Kentucky (Source: Kentucky Geological Society) Map showing Karst in Indiana. (Source: Indiana Geological Survey)Map showing Karst in Indiana. (Source: Indiana Geological Survey) Matt Dettman developed MSEDS, short for Mechanical Sinkhole Early Detection System.Matt Dettman developed MSEDS, short for Mechanical Sinkhole Early Detection System.LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) - It could cost big bucks to detect whether a sinkhole could open up, but soon there may be a device developed in Kentucky to keep families safe nationwide.MORESLIDESHOW: How karst sinkholes formLearn how karst sinkholes form and whether or not you live in an at risk area.MoreGeological surveys to predict a sinkhole cost tens of thousands of dollars. Companies shell out $10,000 to $20,000 for a geotechnical and subsurface investigation before construction.The process isn't necessarily feasible for everyday people.However, a Western Kentucky University Geotechnical Engineer developed a device to detect what's happening beneath your feet.Karst terrain covers more than half of Kentucky. Karst sinkholes form when the bedrock of the Earth is slowly worn away by erosion.[SLIDESHOW: How karst sinkholes form]Under the top soil is a layer called the overburden. Under that is bedrock, which may seem tough and solid, but it's actually filled with cracks and crevices water is constantly seeping through and infiltrating. As the water erodes the bedrock, the overburden starts to fall down into the space left behind. Years later, all that's left is a thin layer and the potential for a sinkhole to open up.However, if there's a slab over the surface you may not know there's a problem until it's too late. That's why Matt Dettman developed MSEDS, short for Mechanical Sinkhole Early Detection System. Dettman is a WKU Associate Professor of Civil Engineering [...]

MSD budgets $200 million for Ohio River Tunnel project – WDRB 41 Louisville News

The Metropolitan Sewer District is budgeting $200 million for the Ohio River Tunnel project to improve water quality in Louisville. LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) – The Metropolitan Sewer District is budgeting $200 million for the Ohio River Tunnel project to improve water quality in Louisville. According to Jacob Mathis, an MSD engineer and manager of this project, just a tenth-of-an-inch of rain can overwhelm parts of the sewer system in the district, sending stormwater and drainage straight into the Ohio River or Beargrass Creek. “In a typical year, there’d be four billion gallons of sewage released into these waterways,” Mathis said. In hopes to reduce sewer drainage across the country, the federal government is requiring communities to find ways to mitigate the damage by Dec. 31, 2020. If Louisville does not meet the deadline, the government could enforce fines or penalties. In response, MSD engineers devised a plan of three new basins in three different neighborhoods to store overflow. But there were concerns over how much that could interrupt construction, business and daily life. MSD decided to take a different route and came up with the Ohio River Tunnel project. “This project is one of the first of its kind in Louisville or even the state of Kentucky,” Mathis said. Engineers describe it as being on the same level and magnitude as the Ohio River bridges undertaking. But this project is intended to be out of sight, out of mind. “There will be less disruption to the community itself with traffic impacts, economic impacts,” Mathis said. “We won’t disturb the big economic corridor along Main Street.” The tunnel will start underneath what will be the western part of Waterfront Park near 13th and Rowan Streets. It’ll head east underneath the Ohio River towards I-64. At the Second Street Bridge, the tunnel then jogs inland to Butchertown. [...]

By | 2017-09-12T15:27:48+00:00 September 12th, 2017|Drilling Kentucky, Geotechnical Kentucky, Louisville, Tunneling|0 Comments

Drilling in Southwest Indiana at a 15-year peak

Indiana State officials say Southwest Indiana is experiencing a boom in oil and gas exploration, with a peak number of wells drilled over the past 15 years. The Indiana Department of Natural Resources Division of Oil and Gas released a report earlier this week that says oil and gas wells are being drilled in Indiana "At a pace that hasn't been seen for at least 15 years," according to Herschel McDivitt, director of the DNR Division of Oil and Gas. DNR officials say the division issued more than 450 drilling permits in 2006, a number that McDivitt expects to steadily increase during the next several years, due to the anticipated higher prices for crude oil and natural gas. "This is an exciting time to be in the oil and gas business," McDivitt said in a press release announcing the news. "While much of the interest is in drilling for crude oil, a growing number of wells are being drilled for natural gas, especially in the southwestern part of Indiana where companies are actively developing wells." McDivitt acknowledged that along with the increase in drilling applications has come a significant number of questions from landowners who have been approached by companies seeking to obtain leases from the landowners allowing them to drill on their properties. "Many landowners are unfamiliar with the process of leasing their land for oil and gas and are seeking more information about oil and gas operations and looking to find answers to their questions," McDivitt said. DNR has also made some changes in the Division of Oil and Gas's organizational structure. Jim AmRhein will be responsible for all inspections and compliance- related functions within the division's program. Previously, AmRhein was in charge of all permitting functions, as well as inspections and enforcement duties in central and northern [...]