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Soil Drilling and soil testing

Drilling in Southwest Indiana at a 15-year peak

Indiana State officials say Southwest Indiana is experiencing a boom in oil and gas exploration, with a peak number of wells drilled over the past 15 years.

The Indiana Department of Natural Resources Division of Oil and Gas released a report earlier this week that says oil and gas wells are being drilled in Indiana “At a pace that hasn’t been seen for at least 15 years,” according to Herschel McDivitt, director of the DNR Division of Oil and Gas.

DNR officials say the division issued more than 450 drilling permits in 2006, a number that McDivitt expects to steadily increase during the next several years, due to the anticipated higher prices for crude oil and natural gas.

“This is an exciting time to be in the oil and gas business,” McDivitt said in a press release announcing the news.

“While much of the interest is in drilling for crude oil, a growing number of wells are being drilled for natural gas, especially in the southwestern part of Indiana where companies are actively developing wells.”

McDivitt acknowledged that along with the increase in drilling applications has come a significant number of questions from landowners who have been approached by companies seeking to obtain leases from the landowners allowing them to drill on their properties.

“Many landowners are unfamiliar with the process of leasing their land for oil and gas and are seeking more information about oil and gas operations and looking to find answers to their questions,” McDivitt said.

DNR has also made some changes in the Division of Oil and Gas’s organizational structure.

Jim AmRhein will be responsible for all inspections and compliance- related functions within the division’s program.

Previously, AmRhein was in charge of all permitting functions, as well as inspections […]

Upcoming Tunneling Projects – Tunnel

2/10/2016

Upcoming Tunneling Projects

CALIFORNIA
Laguna Beach
Tunnel   Stabilization   and   Sewer   Pipeline   Replacement
Approved by the South Coast Water District Board of Directors in 2010 and the City of Laguna Beach in late 2013, the Tunnel Stabilization & Sewer Pipeline Replacement Project (Tunnel Project) is a 100-year solution to protect the environment, local economies and neighboring communities. The project comprises two key components:

  • Tunnel Stabilization: The District will enlarge the size of the tunnel from an average of 6 to 9 ft. This will ensure safer working conditions and greater access for future pipeline maintenance and repair. Permanent shotcrete lining and steel supports will be installed at several locations where required, replacing rotten timber supports and removal of loose rock that currently exist.
  • Pipeline Replacement: The District will install a new 24-in. pipeline throughout the tunnel. The current pipeline – also 24 in. in diameter – will be encased in concrete, but preserved for redundancy and emergency use.

The cost to repair the tunnel is estimated at approximately $90 million and will be funded through low-interest state loans, grants and the District’s general fund. Shortlisted tunnel contractors announcement was anticipated for 2014-2015 with request for bids expected in 2015 and NTP in 2015-2016.

Los Angeles
The   North East   Interceptor   Sewer   (NEIS)   Phase   2A
The North East Interceptor Sewer (NEIS) Phase 2A project is currently the northern extension of the NEIS Phase 1 project. The project will construct approximately 3.03 miles of 8-ft diameter sewer in tunnel and associated structures. The sewer will be constructed from the Division St. Shaft site, near the intersection of San Fernando Road and Cazador Street and terminate at the northern overflow parking lot for the Pony and Train […]

Percolation test

Testing method

A percolation test consists of digging one or more holes in the soil of the proposed leach field to a specified depth, presoaking the holes by maintaining a high water level in the holes, then running the test by filling the holes to a specific level and timing the drop of the water level as the water percolates into the surrounding soil. There are various empirical formulae for determining the required size of a leach field based on the size of facility, the percolation test results, and other parameters.

For leach line testing, a minimum of three test holes are drilled, most commonly six to eight inches in diameter. Ideally, these should be drilled to different depths from three to six feet below the surface. For better, more conclusive results, five drill holes are used in a pattern of one hole at each corner of the proposed leach field and one test hole in the center. Testing of these holes will result in a value with units of minutes per inch. This value is then correlated to a predetermined county health code to establish the exact size of the leach field.

Testing for horizontal pits typically requires five to eight test holes drilled in a straight line, or along a common contour, from three to ten feet below the surface. Testing is identical to leach line testing, though the end result is a different type of septic system, established through a different calculation.

Vertical seepage pits are slightly different in testing methods due to their large size, but the basic testing method is essentially the same. A hole, typically three to four feet in diameter is drilled to a depth of twenty or thirty […]

California highway landslide leaves vehicles buried – video

Aerial footage shows work crews clearing mud and debris following flash floods that left nearly 200 vehicles stuck in up to 5ft (1.5 metres) of mud. The Leona Valley, about 20 miles north of Los Angeles, saw extensive downpours on Thursday, with 3.58 inches (9 cm) of rainfall during a 30 minute period. Elsewhere in southern California, several roads were washed out and there were reports of motorists having to be rescued from torrential flooding

 

Hoosier Environmental Indiana

Air Pollution (External Link) Amtrak Service Asbestos and Mesothelioma (External Link) Bats Biofuels (NRDC Report) Biomass (Union of Concerned

Source: Index of Issues | Hoosier Environmental Council

Index of Issues

Air Pollution (External Link)

Amtrak Service

Asbestos and Mesothelioma (External Link)

Bats

Biofuels (NRDC Report)

Biomass (Union of Concerned Scientists Report)

Blue-Green Algae

CAFOs (Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations)

CFOs (Confined Feeding Operations)

Children’s Health (External Link)

Clean Energy

Clean Power Plan

Clean Water

Climate Change

Coal

Coal Ash

Coal-Fired Power Plants (Union of Concerned Scientists Report)

Combined Heat and Power

Environmental Justice

Factory Farms

Farmer’s Markets (External Link)

Forest Protection

Green Communities

High Speed Passenger Rail

Impaired Waters

Lake County

Mercury (External Link)

Mounds Greenway

Net Metering

Nuclear Power (External Link)

Oil

Open Spaces

Outdoor Wood Boilers (OWBs)

Pathogens in Manure

Patoka River National Wildlife Refuge

Plastic Consumption (External Link)

Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE)

Public Transportation

Renewable Energy

SMSS (Satellite Manure Storage Structures)

Solar (External Link)

Sustainable Agriculture

Watershed Restoration

Well Testing

Wildlife Refuges

Wind Energy

Pence signs bill repealing Indiana construction wage law

A Republican-backed measure that will repeal Indiana’s law setting wages for state and local government construction projects has been approved by Gov. Mike Pence.

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) –

Pence signs repeal of IN construction wage law Pence signs repeal of IN construction wage law

A Republican-backed measure that will repeal Indiana’s law setting wages for state and local government construction projects has been approved by Gov. Mike Pence.

Pence signed the legislation Wednesday and says it will allow the free market to determine pay scales rather than government boards.

Supporters estimate the change will reduce project costs by as much as 20 percent by allowing more contractors to pay wages below union scale. Opponents dispute such savings will occur and say it will open the door for low-paying, out-of-state contractors.

The measure sparked controversy during this year’s legislative session, including a rally that brought thousands of contractors and union members to the Statehouse lawn in April.

The repeal takes effect in July.