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Detecting a sinkhole: New device geared for homeowners – wave3.com-Louisville News, Weather & Sports

Detecting a sinkhole: New device geared for homeowners Karst map for the state of Kentucky (Source: Kentucky Geological Society)Karst map for the state of Kentucky (Source: Kentucky Geological Society) Map showing Karst in Indiana. (Source: Indiana Geological Survey)Map showing Karst in Indiana. (Source: Indiana Geological Survey) Matt Dettman developed MSEDS, short for Mechanical Sinkhole Early Detection System.Matt Dettman developed MSEDS, short for Mechanical Sinkhole Early Detection System.LOUISVILLE, KY (WAVE) - It could cost big bucks to detect whether a sinkhole could open up, but soon there may be a device developed in Kentucky to keep families safe nationwide.MORESLIDESHOW: How karst sinkholes formLearn how karst sinkholes form and whether or not you live in an at risk area.MoreGeological surveys to predict a sinkhole cost tens of thousands of dollars. Companies shell out $10,000 to $20,000 for a geotechnical and subsurface investigation before construction.The process isn't necessarily feasible for everyday people.However, a Western Kentucky University Geotechnical Engineer developed a device to detect what's happening beneath your feet.Karst terrain covers more than half of Kentucky. Karst sinkholes form when the bedrock of the Earth is slowly worn away by erosion.[SLIDESHOW: How karst sinkholes form]Under the top soil is a layer called the overburden. Under that is bedrock, which may seem tough and solid, but it's actually filled with cracks and crevices water is constantly seeping through and infiltrating. As the water erodes the bedrock, the overburden starts to fall down into the space left behind. Years later, all that's left is a thin layer and the potential for a sinkhole to open up.However, if there's a slab over the surface you may not know there's a problem until it's too late. That's why Matt Dettman developed MSEDS, short for Mechanical Sinkhole Early Detection System. Dettman is a WKU Associate Professor of Civil Engineering [...]

Sinkhole increases to 40 feet in Tennessee

Construction crews were trying to fill a massive sinkhole that began at 3 feet by 5 feet at Austin Peay State University’s Governors Stadium in Tennessee. Construction crews were trying to fill a massive sinkhole that began at 3 feet by 5 feet at Austin Peay State University’s Governors Stadium in Tennessee. The hole was first discovered near the football field’s end zone, where it meets the track, during a renovation project to replace the main stadium building about a month ago. The workers have since had to dig a larger hole, about 40 feet deep and 40 feet wide, to find stable bedrock. “We’re not going to skip any steps,” Mike Jenkins, the superintendent for Nashville-based Bell & Associates Construction,

By | 2017-10-04T06:02:41+00:00 May 2nd, 2015|Geotechnical Tennessee, Sinkholes|Comments Off on Sinkhole increases to 40 feet in Tennessee

Sinkholes: When the Earth Opens Up – Impressive collection of sinkhole incidents with photos

Sinkholes: When the Earth Opens Up - Impressive collection of sinkhole incidents with photos The ground beneath our feet, our cars, our buildings, appears to be incredibly solid. But, rarely, that solid ground can simply open up without warning, dropping whatever was above into an unpredictably deep.hole. Sinkholes can be anywhere from a few feet wide and deep, to two thousand feet in diameter and depth. An undiscovered cavern or deep mine can collapse, allowing the ground above to crater, or a broken water main or heavy storm can erode a hole from below, until the surface becomes a thin shell that collapses at once. Communities built atop karst formations are very susceptible, where a layer of bedrock is water-soluble, like limestone, and natural processes can wear away caves and fissures, weakening support of the ground above. Gathered here are images of some of these sinkholes, both man-made and natural, around the world. [28 photos] A car at the bottom of a sinkhole caused by a broken water line in Toledo, Ohio on July 3, 2013. Police say the driver, 60-year-old Pamela Knox of Toledo, was shaken up and didn't appear hurt butwas taken to a hospital as a precaution. Fire officials told a local TV station that a water main break caused the large hole. (AP Photo/Lt. Matthew Hertzfeld, Toledo Fire and Rescue) A Toledo firefighter rescues Pamela Knox after a massive sinkhole opened up underneath her car in Toledo, Ohio, on July 3, 2013. (Reuters/Lt. Matthew Hertzfeld/Toledo Fire and Rescue) A Los Angeles fireman looks under a fire truck stuck in a sinkhole in the Valley Village neighborhood of Los Angeles, on September 8, 2009. Four firefighters escaped injury early Tuesday after their fire engine sunk into a large hole caused by a burst [...]

By | 2017-10-04T06:02:41+00:00 August 30th, 2013|Sinkholes|0 Comments