Louisville Indiana – Kentucky Ohio River Bridges Project

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=26r9MpVATsI Today's "Walk the Bridge" event attracted tens of thousands of people. The Louisville-Southern Indiana Ohio River Bridges Project addresses cross-river transportation needs in Louisville, Kentucky and Southern Indiana and will result in safer travel, less congestion and improved access to destinations in the region. LOUISVILLE, Ky. – Governor Steve Beshear announced that the new Ohio River bridge between Kentucky and Indiana in downtown Louisville will be named the Abraham Lincoln Bridge – connecting, as it does, the states of Lincoln’s birth and raising. “Lincoln led our nation through its bloodiest and greatest constitutional and political crisis – the American Civil War,” Gov. Beshear said. “But at the end of that national trauma, we remained a ‘United’ States of America. It’s therefore fitting that we honor Lincoln’s legacy with a bridge that further unites Kentucky, where he was born, with Indiana then Illinois, where he emigrated as a youth and grew to adulthood.” Kentucky and Indiana jointly are building the bridges project to improve cross-river mobility between Louisville and Southern Indiana. The project also includes construction of a new bridge eight miles upriver, connecting Prospect, Kentucky, and Utica, Indiana.  

Percolation test

Testing method A percolation test consists of digging one or more holes in the soil of the proposed leach field to a specified depth, presoaking the holes by maintaining a high water level in the holes, then running the test by filling the holes to a specific level and timing the drop of the water level as the water percolates into the surrounding soil. There are various empirical formulae for determining the required size of a leach field based on the size of facility, the percolation test results, and other parameters. For leach line testing, a minimum of three test holes are drilled, most commonly six to eight inches in diameter. Ideally, these should be drilled to different depths from three to six feet below the surface. For better, more conclusive results, five drill holes are used in a pattern of one hole at each corner of the proposed leach field and one test hole in the center. Testing of these holes will result in a value with units of minutes per inch. This value is then correlated to a predetermined county health code to establish the exact size of the leach field. Testing for horizontal pits typically requires five to eight test holes drilled in a straight line, or along a common contour, from three to ten feet below the surface. Testing is identical to leach line testing, though the end result is a different type of septic system, established through a different calculation. Vertical seepage pits are slightly different in testing methods due to their large size, but the basic testing method is essentially the same. A hole, typically three to four feet in diameter is drilled to a depth of twenty or thirty feet (depending on the local groundwater table), and a fire hose is used to [...]

Contractor refuses to refund INDOT for crumbling asphalt | Construction Dive

Indiana highway contractor Brooks Construction said the transportation department's specifications are to blame for the state's asphalt problems. Indiana highway contractor Brooks Construction said it will not comply with the Indiana Department of Transportation’s (INDOT) ultimatum that the company either refund $5.15 million or re-install three miles of crumbling asphalt, according to a statement released by John Brooks, executive vice president of Brooks Construction. Brooks said INDOT conducted 72 successful tests on the asphalt mix in question during the course of the project, paid his company in full for their work, and even paid bonuses of $18,000 for "an asphalt mix that exceeded requirements." INDOT is currently testing asphalt samples from 188 recent road projects across the state, and up to $71 million worth of pavement may be defective and could deteriorate ahead of schedule due to flaws in the asphalt mix. Brooks Construction is the first contractor to be held responsible since INDOT begain its investigation into the faulty asphalt on state roads, and INDOT has not yet released any other results that implicate other highway contractors. INDOT maintains that the fault lies in the asphalt mix that contractors have been using, but critics of INDOT blame the road problems on the recycled asphalt INDOT incorporated into its specifications in 2010. In response to Brooks' refusal to comply with INDOT’s demand, an INDOT spokesman told WRTV that the department would seek to resolve the issue through Brooks' insurance company. "As a family-owned business building projects in Indiana for more than 100 years, we are committed to working with INDOT to resolve the state's widespread pavement issues,” Brooks said in his statement. “We will not, however, accept legal responsibility for an industry problem caused by INDOT's specifications and quality assurance program.” Source: Contractor refuses to refund INDOT for crumbling asphalt | Construction Dive

Interstate 10 in California closed east of Coachella after bridge collapse

A 30-foot section of a bridge on the 10 Freeway in Desert Center east of Coachella co A 30-foot section of a bridge on the 10 Freeway in Desert Center east of Coachella collapsed Sunday, closing Interstate 10 indefinitely. The 10 Freeway was shut down from Desert Center to the Arizona state line as a result of the bridge collapse and heavy flooding, authorities said. llapsed Sunday, closing Interstate 10 indefinitely.Source: Interstate 10 closed east of Coachella after bridge collapse

Construction of Wind Farm Project in Indiana

Pattern Development Completes Financing and Starts Construction of Amazon Wind Farm Project in Indiana 150 MW wind project to use American-made turbines and create more than 300 jobs; Power to be acquired by Amazon SAN FRANCISCO , May 4, 2015 /CNW/ -- Construction is ramping up at the Amazon Wind Farm (Fowler Ridge) project. Pattern Energy Group LP ("Pattern Development") today announced the closing of financing on the 150 megawatt (MW) Amazon Wind Farm (Fowler Ridge) project located in Benton County, Indiana . The project has entered into a 13-year power purchase agreement with Amazon to supply electricity to the electric grids that service Amazon Web Services, Inc. (AWS) datacenters. View gallery . "The Amazon Wind Farm project has successfully closed financing and is moving ahead on schedule," said Mike Garland , President and CEO of Pattern Development. "We look forward to helping Amazon power its customers' businesses with domestic clean energy harnessed from the winds of Indiana . We are now working with Amazon, Google and Walmart, demonstrating that America's leading corporations are increasingly investing in, or buying power from, non-polluting energy sources like wind power. We see this growing trend driving the development of more new projects." The Amazon Wind Farm (Fowler Ridge) project will utilize 65 Siemens 2.3 MW turbines with 'Made in America' components. The turbine blades are being manufactured at the Siemens factory in Ft. Madison, Iowa and the nacelles are being assembled at the Siemens facility in Hutchinson, Kansas . The turbine towers will be sourced from Michigan and Wisconsin . Transformers for the project will be manufactured at the Siemens facility in Richland, Mississippi . "Siemens is proud that our 'Made in America' wind components will be used at the Amazon Wind Farm. Wind power is an increasingly important part of our nation's energy [...]

Pence signs bill repealing Indiana construction wage law

A Republican-backed measure that will repeal Indiana's law setting wages for state and local government construction projects has been approved by Gov. Mike Pence. INDIANAPOLIS (AP) - Pence signs repeal of IN construction wage law A Republican-backed measure that will repeal Indiana's law setting wages for state and local government construction projects has been approved by Gov. Mike Pence. Pence signed the legislation Wednesday and says it will allow the free market to determine pay scales rather than government boards. Supporters estimate the change will reduce project costs by as much as 20 percent by allowing more contractors to pay wages below union scale. Opponents dispute such savings will occur and say it will open the door for low-paying, out-of-state contractors. The measure sparked controversy during this year's legislative session, including a rally that brought thousands of contractors and union members to the Statehouse lawn in April. The repeal takes effect in July.